Discussion:
"The Texas- Siberian Trail" - a short review
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ThePulp.Net editor
2014-07-15 23:15:13 UTC
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Okay, after John Olsen's comment, I figured I should step up. ...

Back in the early spring, I had the great fortune of meeting Nicky
Wheeler-Nicholson, the granddaughter of Maj. Malcolm Wheeler-Nicholson
at a nearby convention.

I was mostly familiar with the Major's background as one of the founders
of DC Comics. But before that, he was a pulp fictioneer.

Nicky was promoting a book of her grandfather's adventure stories, "The
Texas-Siberian Trail." The book was edited by John Locke and published
by his Off-Trail Publications.

Being known as the Major obvious indicates that he had a military
background. In the preface, Nicky discusses his service in the U.S. Army
Cavalry along the Texas-Mexico border and the Philippines, and in
Military Intelligence in Asia and Russia, then onto the Western Front of
World War I.

The book's title reflects the Major's military service, as well as how
the book is organized. Rather than reprinting the stories in
chronological order, the stories appear based on his military postings.

The first two stories, "Beelzebub the Bane" and "Shavetail," take place
along the Mexican frontier. "The Colonel Who Drank Along" is in the
Philippines. The next three, "The Tiger of the Ussuri," "The Czarina's
Pearls" and "The Dumb Bunny," are set in Russia. The final two, "Treason
for Glory" and "The Road Without Turning," on the Western Front.

The stories were originally published between 1927 and 1932, with all
but one in ADVENTURE ("Shavetail" ran in ARGOSY).

The Major writes pretty tight stories. Very little is padding, as most
everything is pushing the stories forward. He writes authoritatively,
too. It's clear he knows what he's writing about, whether it's taming a
horse, working with a tainted officer, or dealing with unsavory Russians.

It's a very entertaining book and a great way to spend a few evenings
reading.

- Bill
--
William Lampkin

http://ThePulp.Net
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http://www.thepulp.net/yellowedperils/
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John Olsen
2014-07-16 07:14:38 UTC
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Thanks for the review, Bill. Much appreciated.

I'll have to go through some of my old Adventure issues and read some of
his stories. I don't think I've read any, before, so am looking forward
to it.

Thanks for the heads-up!

John
Post by ThePulp.Net editor
Okay, after John Olsen's comment, I figured I should step up. ...
Back in the early spring, I had the great fortune of meeting Nicky
Wheeler-Nicholson, the granddaughter of Maj. Malcolm Wheeler-Nicholson
at a nearby convention.
I was mostly familiar with the Major's background as one of the founders
of DC Comics. But before that, he was a pulp fictioneer.
Nicky was promoting a book of her grandfather's adventure stories, "The
Texas-Siberian Trail." The book was edited by John Locke and published
by his Off-Trail Publications.
Being known as the Major obvious indicates that he had a military
background. In the preface, Nicky discusses his service in the U.S. Army
Cavalry along the Texas-Mexico border and the Philippines, and in
Military Intelligence in Asia and Russia, then onto the Western Front of
World War I.
The book's title reflects the Major's military service, as well as how
the book is organized. Rather than reprinting the stories in
chronological order, the stories appear based on his military postings.
The first two stories, "Beelzebub the Bane" and "Shavetail," take place
along the Mexican frontier. "The Colonel Who Drank Along" is in the
Philippines. The next three, "The Tiger of the Ussuri," "The Czarina's
Pearls" and "The Dumb Bunny," are set in Russia. The final two, "Treason
for Glory" and "The Road Without Turning," on the Western Front.
The stories were originally published between 1927 and 1932, with all
but one in ADVENTURE ("Shavetail" ran in ARGOSY).
The Major writes pretty tight stories. Very little is padding, as most
everything is pushing the stories forward. He writes authoritatively,
too. It's clear he knows what he's writing about, whether it's taming a
horse, working with a tainted officer, or dealing with unsavory Russians.
It's a very entertaining book and a great way to spend a few evenings
reading.
- Bill
--
"Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men? The Shadow knows!"
The wonderful old pulp mystery stories are all reviewed at:

http://home.comcast.net/~deshadow/
Opry phantom
2014-07-23 04:42:40 UTC
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Post by ThePulp.Net editor
Okay, after John Olsen's comment, I figured I should step up. ...
Back in the early spring, I had the great fortune of meeting Nicky
Wheeler-Nicholson, the granddaughter of Maj. Malcolm Wheeler-Nicholson
at a nearby convention.
I was mostly familiar with the Major's background as one of the founders
of DC Comics. But before that, he was a pulp fictioneer.
Nicky was promoting a book of her grandfather's adventure stories, "The
Texas-Siberian Trail." The book was edited by John Locke and published
by his Off-Trail Publications.
Some time back I read a story by him from ALL-FICTION, "Lances of Tartary".
This was one of those yarns that were popular in the pulps where a Crusader rides with the Mongols against the Turkish armies. Of course Prester John is mentioned.
All in all, a good yarn in quasi Howard\Lamb like style.

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